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    Michael Wolf and the Architecture of Density


    Michael Wolf's Architecture of Density

    German-born photographer Michael Wolf documents the extreme densities of Hong Kong. His series ‘Architecture of Density’ rarely contain images of people, instead letting the extreme scale of the buildings remain as the focus. The images are stunning, though I’m not quite sure how to react. It’s overwhelming to view the scale and enormity of the buildings, and then realize that people live there. The post-modernist in me wants to decry the lack of humanity in the high rises. But these images aren’t hopeless. After all, we created those buildings, right?

    Michael Wolf's Architecture of Density

    Says Rebecca Walker (.pdf):

    A close look at one of Wolf’s architectural images uncovers irregularities such as plants, laundry and scaffolding that interrupt the orderly design of monolithic apartment buildings.

    Michael Wolf's Architecture of Density

    The monotonous regularity of each fa?ßade is given a distinct personality through human details.

    Michael Wolf's Architecture of Density

    Adds Kenneth Baker (another .pdf):

    Various images describe the facades of monstrously tall and repetitive residential highrise buildings, views cropped to make the structures appear as if they might extend indefinitely, upwards and down.

    Michael Wolf's Architecture of Density

    The camera eye appears to hover, nearly causing us to lose the sense of which direction is earthward, even in the images that include the tops of street lights. These structures seem almost to float free of the planet and extend themselves in space without constraint.

    Michael Wolf's Architecture of Density

    I’ll chose not to view these images as overwhelming or hopeless. After all, pull far enough out of any setting and you’ll realize just how small each of us are. I’m in there, somewhere.


    Check out Michael Wolf’s book Hong Kong Inside Outside on Amazon

    Link



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    87 Responses to “Michael Wolf and the Architecture of Density”

    1. […] post does a good job at summarizing the concept. tags: photo link, photography, urban 2006-7-1-10:09 AM # via:Reddit […]

    2. Gleb says:

      I think people in Hong Kong have a different conception of personal space, especially when it comes to housing. People eat out a lot and hang out in public spaces – the home is seen as more of a basic dormitory. Most people I spoke to when I visited don’t seem to mind living in these huge apartment blocks.

    3. Mike says:

      Thanks for sharing, Gleb. I certainly have my own biases when it comes to personal space; it’s always to compare how different cultures perceive what is comfortable and what is not. Certainly Americans claim to need absurd amounts of space, at least compared to what much of the world is used to. It’s sounds like people in Hong Kong use private and public spaces in different ways.

    4. squidfdartz says:

      Those images are beautiful.
      Just amazing.
      TsH

    5. TrevC says:

      Amazing imagery. Thanks for introducing me to this photographers work

    6. mark says:

      As an Australian currently living and working in mainland China I understand the differences between what “western” people consider ‘space’ and that same space that those of us who live in less developed parts of the planet consider a space.
      This does not mean that I see that it is a good thing nor do I see it as a bad thing it is just different, and it is these differences that make our planet an interesting place to live – As a westerner in China I am faced with a constant stream of both preople and cars and lack of space – the space that I am alloted as a foriegner (working) in China is different to that a Chinese “worker” in the same position as myself is “allowed” I am costantly frustrated by this reverse discrimination – It seems to me that we all share the planet, so therefore we should all share our resources (including space) it is only the governments of the world that make this utopian dream impossible. Thanks also for the wonderful images.

    7. […] Three years ago I went to Hong Kong for a vacation because after the first SARS outbreak, it was extremely cheap to travel there and I’d never been to Asia before. One thing I imagine every westerner is immediately struck by when going to someplace like Hong Kong is how everyone lives right on top of each other. There’s just no space between people’s personal spaces. The funny thing is that there’s plenty of room in Hong Kong for people to spread out, they just don’t. […]

    8. medeshago says:

      that is real?

    9. […] Hiperdensidad urbanistica (Suena a espacial) […]

    10. ahmet alp balkan says:

      wow they are interesting if they are not a photoshop trick ;)

    11. It likes MATRIX movie. I think all of us, all humanity need space in our home and our mind

    12. […] Toplu konut b??yle bir ?üey olsa gerek. Buradan ba?üka fotoƒüraflara da ula?üƒ±labilir. […]

    13. Jensol says:

      Impressive. Your work suggests the limit of figurative towards abstract. I want to see more, because I’m puzzled. Yes, human is in there. And human may too be such an impressive structure. It is a question of perspective. Let me know of your work. I like it very much.

    14. colin bennett says:

      i believe these photos are not hopeless, but actually the opposite
      it appears as though we are meant to believe that these buildings stretch inifintely towards the sky, but somewhere up there, way at the top floor,

      is a person whose bedroom window looks out over the entire world

    15. Mike says:

      [quote comment=”636″]Impressive. Your work suggests the limit of figurative towards abstract. I want to see more, because I’m puzzled. Yes, human is in there. And human may too be such an impressive structure. It is a question of perspective. Let me know of your work. I like it very much.[/quote]

      Just to be clear, these aren’t my photos. This is the work of photographer Michael Wolf.

    16. twizted says:

      the first one hit me hard, wow, …. amazing even if it is photoshop tricks

    17. Eric says:

      Well… I don’t know what to say really, The sheer size of these buildings and I imagine the mass of people living in them is almost overwhelming. My complements to the photographer, I’ve never even seen buildings like these before.

    18. thaine says:

      dig it.

    19. thaine says:

      i should add that it reminds me of john register. the environments are distinctly human, but lacking any human presence. it gives me a sense of wonder mixed with despair. i like these a lot.

    20. Vince says:

      Interesting to look at. Wouldn’t want to live there. Not sure they’re all real.

    21. Angie says:

      These images seem to defy the laws of perspective. I am in awe of the structures. They tend to make one stop and think about how small our world really is.

    22. Rich says:

      You people disgust me! LOOK AT THIS FIRST PHOTO! People are living there, in terrible conditions, with little or no filtration of their water, pourly routed electric, a sloping foundation. And this would be considered a palace to some people in the world, and all you jerks can think about is… wow… cool buildings. Yes maybe he is a architectural photographer… but please tell me you all are not as shallow as to only see the buildings in these pictures.

      Stop being so goddamn “AMERICAN”!!! So self centered that when you look at photos like this, you say “oo neat buildings”. While some of you say “wow shows how small the world is” you follow it up with “COOL PICS!” Same kind of people who buy a backpack and without really knowing it think “Wow those indonesian kids really know how to put zippers on”

      All i am saying is stop being so shallow and realize the social MURDER that is obvious here.

      Thank you…

      Now you may all feel free to bash me as much as you want… i dont really care. At least im not a self centered, arogant, recource whore!

    23. Joe says:

      Hey Rich, put a cork in it. You are going to blame America for some problems with the waters of Hong Kong? That is idiotic. While it’s not a place I’d want to live, the people living there have the right to live where they choose. What do you suggest, knocking down their homes so they are out on the street? Or maybe since you aren’t a “resource whore” you should go over there and give them all your resources. Have a nice trip.

    24. Graeme says:

      To Rich, regarding your comments about the filtration of those people’s water or the routing of electricity. How very presumptious of you. I’ve saw many blocks of flats in the asia pacific region which look just like that, and most are very new, barely 10 years or so, its just that in the pacific region the heavy rainfall blackens and makes the buildings look filthy on the outside. Wheras westerners would paint the building, Asian’s for some reason don’t care. And who are we do even discuss the way others choose to live? There is no way to tell from that photograph, the living conditions inside, trust me. If you think that’s bad, take a trip to Bangkok; my how you’ll scream.

    25. Vince says:

      I think he makes a valid point, though, about the ease of romanticizing other people’s misery. If this first photo to the left were a tenement in the Bronx, for example, we’d be calling for politicians’ heads, not speaking about being in awe of the scope of humanity.

    26. jim says:

      i wonder what our distant ancestors would have made of these pictures they seem to display a sense of an abject poverty of life quality yet they also hint at a quality of community never before witnessed or is it in fact austere isolation

    27. Graeme says:

      Yes Vince, I understand. In America or the UK (where I am from originally) if a block of flats looked like that then the insides would be a seathing cesspool of dirt and disease, no one would live there except criminals and drug addicts, and once enough people complained to the authorities, it would be torn down and the occupants split up and moved into nicer neighborhoods.

      However, please everyone set aside your western notions, and just consider that since Asians don’t bother about painting buildings and the heavy rainfall turns the exterior black very quickly; many flats look like that on the outside.

      Don’t extrapolate from the dirty look of the building that the occupants are living in abject poverty! Or live in misery! They probably all have clean apartments, a decent standard of living, and normal standards of socialisation within their culture.

      But perhaps I’m talking from a viewpoint which is incomprehinsible to those who have never left their own country, and chose to comment upon the world from the comfort of their armchair? huh?

    28. Vince says:

      It’s too bad you chose to end your remark by smugly insulting those who didn’t share your point of view. A little narrow-minded.

    29. Nu says:

      “They probably all have clean apartments, a decent standard of living, and normal standards of socialization within their culture.”

      Sorry, but I have to say you are strictly incorrect, from an “insider” point of view. I, for one, live in Hong Kong (Is my notion Asian enough for you?) and speak some coherent English, and some of the conditions in those buildings – mainly spread along old urban districts such as Wai Chai, Chai Wan, Mong Kok etc.) is TERRIBLE. Most are built near the 60’s and 70’s, with inadequate fire systems, public toilets, very little space – usually only one room in the whole flat, very bad lighting and wiring that can cause electrocution etc. Few are even on the verge of collapsing, although it’s only 5 floors or so; just earlier this month, there are lots of cases of debris and window frames falling off the buildings. It’s not mainly the low-income families that lives there (they usually live in public housing, which has hygienic conditions to say the least) but the elderly. The elderly, who, despite the bad living conditions, refused to leave, because apparently they have “valuable memories within the building, and deep feelings”.

      The situation is not as “hopeless” as it sounds though. The government is attempting to carry out “Urban Renewal”, demolishing ancient buildings and building newer ones in its place. However, it’s rather difficult when you have to provide shelter for the objecting residents (some of the elderly are even adamant to the point of refusing to leave their room – the living room – for a week over the news.)

      “The funny thing is that there‚Äôs plenty of room in Hong Kong for people to spread out, they just don‚Äôt.”

      Really? I don’t recall learning that even in Form 1 (Grade 7) geography. Hong Kong has a hilly terrain, with very little lowlands, there’s no denying that. As a result, many of us have to build high-raise buildings on the slopes. I’m fairly certain Hong Kong Island has a large population per square meter, thus the lack of space. If you’re talking about the “space” in the outlying islands, Kowloon and New Territories, firstly, the HK government is trying to go for a “greener” look, secondly, for convenient purposes, most of the population are gathered around Hong Kong Island – which, if you argue has space, I’ll call you delusional, and lastly, although it seemed more has moved to Kowloon and the New Territories in recent years, they ARE still newly developed towns.

      “- most are very new, barely 10 years or so, its just that in the pacific region the heavy rainfall blackens and makes the buildings look filthy on the outside. Whereas westerners would paint the building, Asian‚Äôs for some reason don‚Äôt care.”

      We DO care. If you look at buildings TWENTY years or so, you will discover that they’re painted in dull white, though brand new, or other assorted colors. If you look at buildings under one year old, like Ming Mun (The Legend) or even The Grand Promenade you’ll be amazed, if you think Hong Kong looks like such filth. They reach very high up into the sky – 80 floors or so I believe – the texture of the exterior is some glass material, I suppose, and the architectural style is…superb. Or just look at the twinkling skyscrapers in Central at night, over the Peak or Victoria Harbour – one word: gorgeous.

      And Joe: Hong Kong is a place of beauty in its own right. See above.

    30. Aus says:

      As a Aussie boy who has recently moved to HK, these are the first photos I have seen that show how the buildings in HK actually are. It is hard to describe how tall HK buildings are – especially to Australians. I live in a complex that has 5 towers of over 70 floors each. And that is not unusual.

      These pictures are real, I assure you.

      Recently in one suburb close to a beach (not on HK island though) the council has banned high-rise buildings. So, nothing over 13 floors. Also, some apartment complexes are that large they actual change the flow of are through the area.

      With regards to the first photo, this is also not uncommon in some areas, but these are peoples homes and they do take pride in them (mostly). It is not social murder as one Poster said. It is reality and there are alot more people in the world worse off.

    31. John says:

      These pictures are real, but they do not tell the full story of life in Hong Kong. I am from Hong Kong and it is one of the most dynamic places on earth. And as a urban planner by education, Hong Kong is probably the closest city there is to a model city in planning, transportation, and architecture. One must understand that there is a historical aspect to Hong Kong’s hyperdensity. It is a culmination of a small geographic space (only 85 developable square miles), a rapid postwar economy, a politically and economically situated location, a boom in immigration influx in the 1960s, and a government that at the same time is one of the most socially involved in the free world but also one of the most hands off as well. In other words, everything sort of just happend all at once, within the span of 40 or so years, starting in the 1960s. The result has admittedly been a free for all for developers in the Pacific Rim, as the highest amount of floor area ratio has always superceded other concerns. But it was at the same time part of the solution, as every year the government had to look for ways to house a ever increasing population.

      If you were to go to Hong Kong, you would not get the impression that people are starving, or that their living conditions is social murder. It is, in fact, one of the wealthiest cities in the world with high education marks and one of the best public transportation systems in the world. In fact, the hyperdensity of Hong Kong is what makes it one of the most accessible, convenient, and vibrant cities on earth. The notion of overcrowded is a term used to denote places that due to its overpopulation, is unable to sustain itself in terms of living space, food, sustenance, and so on. There is a difference between overcrowded and high population density, the latter actually being a phenomenom that has many benefits economically, socially, and environmentally. Think of cities like New York, San Francisco, London, and Paris. Hong Kong is essentially the same, but more advanced in technology and town planning. This is not to say that there are places in Hong Kong that are total dumps but go to every major world city and I will show you a part of the city that is old and dirty and in need of repair.

      Sorry for the novel, but my point is, there are things we can learn from dense cities like Hong Kong. Of course growing up in the west we are used to huge backyards, wide highways, and driving cars. For many other people in the world, the home is but a small part of their everyday life and the public urban realm becomes an extension of living for them; it is just as part of their home as the frontyard is to ours.

    32. […] Michael Wolf documenta as densidades extremas de Hong Kong atrav?©s de fotos chocantes. Lembro de ler sobre isso um tempo atr?°s mas esse post num blog me lembrou do assunto. S?? olhar a foto abaixo para imaginar o drama que deve ser residir num local como esse. [Michael Wolf] Add to: document.write(“Del.icio.us”) | Digg it | RawSugar | Slashdot | Y! MyWeb […]

    33. akrok says:

      excellent photograhy. sure are denst and pretty poor living conditions.

      by the way, all cityies has there own problems. and wolf point out this.

      “Don‚Äôt extrapolate from the dirty look of the building that the occupants are living in abject poverty! Or live in misery! They probably all have clean apartments, a decent standard of living, and normal standards of socialisation within their culture.”

      Sure, dont blame the ones living there. Blame the one who build it!

      ciao,
      akrok

    34. dee says:

      total hell.

    35. rick says:

      omg. this is the not-so-nice side of HK. it’s overwhelming, in a not so nice way.

    36. miro says:

      omg…ich kenne diese photos alle schon, hab ich schon vor einiger zeit von dir gesehen!! unglaublich!!

      lg, m.

    37. James says:

      I think these buildings are absolutely beautiful.
      Must visit Hong Kong now and see things like this for myself.

    38. Evyl says:

      Overwhelmed? It’s hard to believe these pictures are real. Beautiful yet terrifying. Images from The Matrix come to mind. I do not know whether HK is a nice city to live in – I suspect that next-door neighbours myay have differing answers – but I can well believe that even, or especially, in those massive buildings each and every little cell will be as individual as its owner.

    39. Hemant Thite says:

      u said thousand things without words

    40. polsh says:

      I have to do a case study on the population density of hong kong at school and this is the first website i found which is actually helpful! thank you very much. especially Nu.
      These pictures are amazing! breath-taking. photographic genius. thank you

    41. […] En Jap??n la mayor??a de la gente vive en casas en vez de edificios. Aun as?? hay ciertas zonas de edificios que parecen dise?±ados con el simple prop??sito de albergar el m?°ximo n??mero de fam??lias en el menor espacio posible. Para edificios horribles la gran ganadora es Hong Kong donde la zona rica est?° llena de rascacielos impresionantes y la zona pobre son todo construcciones inhumanas. ¬øHay unas fotos por Internet bastante impresionantes de Hong Kong, cuyo enlace no encuentro, alguien lo recuerda? Gracias a todos por el enlace -> magicalurbanism. […]

    42. […] In Japan most of the people doesn¬¥t live in buildings, they prefer family houses. Even though, there are some areas where there are lots of buildings that seem to be designed with the only purpose of keeping the maximum number of families without using too much space. The worst city in the world creating horrible huge buildings is Hong Kong, where the rich zone has incredible beautiful skycrapers but the poor suburbs are full of “architecture of density” (Click this link, the photos are impressive). […]

    43. A student researching this topic! says:

      Hello,
      I am a student studying at an international academy. We are required to research a topic that deals with world issues. My issue deals with population density, architectural styles, and each different culture’s opinions on personal space allowance. I found these pictures fascinating and was hoping that you might have more information on these topics. Your quotes take an interesting perspective. I would also like to say that the people who left comments about the culture’s necessities for space really helped to open my eyes wider.
      If you could email me any information you may have regarding this topic, I would be much obliged.

      If any of the people who commented on this topic could email me any new information or interesting sites that would be very helpful to my research as well!

      Look_At_My_Rock@yahoo.com

    44. Proud Hong Kong Islander says:

      Frankly these architecture are beautiful— and I am proud of them.

      Most of the dense supertalls (except the first pic) are NOT signs of poverty, rather they show the sign of wealth of the city.

      These pics are the best of our residential side of Hong Kong, one of the most beautiful city around the world! Having a flat in a supertall is in fact a symbol of status.

      I am now living in a small flat (circa 700 sq.ft) in Stanley, a high-income neighbourhood in Hong Kong. By far we claim that we have high living standard, despite our lack of spaces (and often smell of trash in Stanley)… Most of the residents are middle-class, crime problem is by far minor.

    45. […] May 26th, 2007 ( via magical urbanism ) […]

    46. […] arquitecture of density Michael Wolf and the Architecture of Density German-born photographer Michael Wolf documents the extreme densities of Hong Kong. His series ëArchitecture of Densityí rarely contain images of people, instead letting the extreme scale of the buildings remain as the focus. The images are stunning, though Iím not quite sure how to react. Itís overwhelming to view the scale and enormity of the buildings, and then realize that people live there. The post-modernist in me wants to decry the lack of humanity in the high rises. But these images arenít hopeless. After all, we created those buildings, right? Says Rebecca Walker (.pdf):A close look at one of Wolfís architectural images uncovers irregularities such as plants, laundry and scaffolding that interrupt the orderly design of monolithic apartment buildings. The monotonous regularity of each faÁade is given a distinct personality through human details. Adds Kenneth Baker (another .pdf):Various images describe the facades of monstrously tall and repetitive residential highrise buildings, views cropped to make the structures appear as if they might extend indefinitely, upwards and down. Link via design industry. More after the jump The camera eye appears to hover, nearly causing us to lose the sense of which direction is earthward, even in the images that include the tops of street lights. These structures seem almost to float free of the planet and extend themselves in space without constraint. Iíll chose not to view these images as overwhelming or hopeless. After all, pull far enough out of any setting and youíll realize just how small each of us are. Iím in there, somewhere. __________________ free hugs here! […]

    47. Don King says:

      I had the displeasure of spending a few weeks in Hong Kong on
      a business partnership. I haven’t a socialist bone in my body but I tell you
      this is the epicenter of exploitation of people in our so called modern west world.

    48. zfeezy says:

      Wow. Nice work –

    49. AlexCano says:

      Humans living in a cage.

    50. […] Sin perder de vista el delirio visual, here cometh Norbert Knox, una mezcla entre la pintura religiosa mejicana, las portadas m?°s aberrantes del jebi metal y la colecci??n de cromos ‘Monstruos Diab??licos’ (que por cierto, est?° recopilada aqu??). Algo m?°s sofisticadas y tambi?©n diab??licas a su manera son las extrapolaciones urban??sticas de Michael Wolf: Arquitecture of Density. […]

    51. ashley k says:

      these pictures are not real…..i’m living in HK……this photographer use photoshop (or other software, i dunno) to copy the buildings and make it unbelievably tall and compacted….

      omg…..HK is not that horrible……dun believe da pictures

    52. Inna says:

      I have lives in one of such buildings from the eastern block. What’s interesting is that the communications and relationships between people living there become much closer than in typical blocks of single family homes we see in US. Regardless if those images are photoshoped or not, they are not necessarily horrible. Form is just but one reflection of Urbanism.

    53. adamk says:

      I was trying to figure out why my HK pictures don’t look like this….. Awesome pictures. Even more on his site. Thanks for posting.

    54. […] High Density Housing ¬†A series of beautiful and abstract photos of housing in¬†Hong Kong.¬†¬† […]

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    56. AppavalaySyPe says:

      “But don’t you worry, its for a cause — feeding global corporations’ paws.”

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    57. Jason says:

      Awesome stuff! Some super photos! Well done

    58. […] Michael Wolf es un fotografo Aleman, que realizo un documental en fotos conocido como “Architecture of Density” en donde refleja como viven la mayoria de las personas en Hong Kong: en un espacio monotono y muy reducido. Parece increible, pero estas fotos son verdaderas, no han sido retocadas ni manejadas digitalmente, asi es como vive la parte mayoritaria de la poblacion en Hong Kong . Via: Magical Urbanism Categoría: Dise?±o, Off Topic COMP?ÅRTELO Cerrar […]

    59. Phil says:

      Stunning. As an former architecture and fine art student, these images really appeal. Truly stunning images.

    60. Infonyunady says:

      What is bumburbia?

    61. Niche Pro says:

      I don’t see how people can live like that it would drive me crazy being in an area with that many people

    62. tommy says:

      It is like a giant termite mound.

    63. […] I came across images from Michael Wolf some time ago but just saw them again today. The series Architecture of Density shows some beautifully scary pictures of Hong Kong. originally seen at Magical Urbanism, reminded again by Kate Andrews […]

    64. Lord Barham says:

      We can argue about whether these scenes represent poverty and squalid living conditions, or someone’s idea of luxury til the cows come home. Frankly, I find the images disturbing for another reason; namely, because this is what the future looks like for Planet Earth. However, it is a future that is unsustainable in the long run and will bankrupt our resource capital to create it. Yet, create it we almost certainly will, because human beings, in the mass, are no more intelligent than a colony of ants.

    65. […] The Exceptional City: Hong KongI just got back from Hong Kong and thought I would share a few pics I took. I really enjoyed my time there and found it to be an exceptional City. It’s density, scale and natural setting are really remarkable. The first observation any outsider will probably have is that the buildings really are tall.I snapped this from a crossing above a street on the outskirts of the city. Even in less central parts of Hong Kong, the buildings are quite large.The famous view from Victoria’s Peak is not only beautiful and impress, it really does a great job explaining the density. Hong Kong evolved a small sliver of land between the water for the port and the mountains to the north. There was no direction to go, other than up.The streets are really active and alive. Every little alley seems to be teeming with shops, food stands and people going in and out of their homes.Even at night, markets are abuzz.The tower of the International Finance Centre dominates the skyline for now, but it looks like it’s soon have company.You can read a previous post about Hong Kong here.google_ad_client="ca-pub-3012988026870532";google_ad_slot="9254229053";google_ad_width=468;google_ad_height=15; Thursday, December 2nd, 2010. Filed under: Photography Travel UrbanizationAdd your commentCancel your reply […]

    66. […] for better usage of limited spaces.Be sure to contrast this take on density to the one provided by Michael Wolf.Images via The Design Blog Monday, December 6th, 2010. Filed under: Architecture Design […]

    67. […] unique visits from 172 countries/territories for a total of 374,116 pageviews.Top 10 Posts 1. Michael Wolf and the Architecture of Density 2. The Fake Door in Paris 3. Dawn Ng’s Paper Planes 4. Michael Hows’ Fallout Shelter […]

    68. Chi says:

      I live in HK. If you try to copy this tin shui wai(one of poor people area) and HK old building(old people living build, some of them cost half Million $US per flat) to Google image you could find similar picture like that, but aren’t that bad may be just the angle of it. I live in shatin by the river. Google earth it……

      Read more at Magical Urbanism: http://www.magicalurbanism.com/?p=127#ixzz1Ens5CNYi

    69. […] Original Source See more photos here […]

    70. Mp says:

      Breathtaking, Some photo’s reminds me of the bijlmer Amsterdam.
      http://www.archello.com/en/project/wozoco/image1

    71. A_HK_Citizen says:

      The Hong Kong’s Chief executive officer insisted that there isn’t any housing problem in Hong Kong.
      What a shame!!!

    72. Rui says:

      I’m so sorry to read such things that i’ve read here… My god, how you people are so self centered and dont even bother tolook beyond what your own eyes see. If you do some research you’d know what is this all about.
      I’m a photographer and university photography student. I’m portuguese and thank god i’m open minded.
      I’ve done an investigation work about the work of this photographer and the population density in hong, since that is the main theme this photographer works on for more than 20 years.
      I see you people make your own conceptions only based on what you think its right or wrong, but think a little, that notion, and megalomaniac seof-rightious way of thinking, tend to change a LOT from one continent to another and even from neighbour contries.

      Hong kong is one of the most populated places on earth, so being, people there dont have space so spread on horizontal basis, sothey have to spread vertically.
      For your own awe, know,that the people living in that buildings leave just can on a village, and they are happy.
      And also know, that one flat on, lets say, the 50th floor could cost over 400.000 dollars and have just 100m2.
      It is just the way of living of that people. Most of them have more monney than you all that think they are poor could count. Life there is not about your possetions.

      Most of them are bank workers people working on the stock market, etc. They just have a different way of seeing and using space, and believe me, they’re happy.

      Investigate a little about this photographer and you’ll know what i’m talking about. You’ll even find him talking about thepeople inside that kind of buildings. And he is german but living in china for more than 20 years.

      He has done architecture of density, wich are the series you’ve seen above, but he has also done the series 100×100, in wich he photographed the interiors 100 flats of one of those buildings with the owners inside.

      People, open your minds to teach your eyes. Its not all about how we see things but we can learn a lot about how others see and feel.

      Earth is so big and believe than our simple lifes are nothing compared to the world sice and complexity.

    73. […] Wolf, who created the impressive Architecture of Density series, photographed of residents in their flats in Shek Kip Mei Estate, the oldest public housing […]

    74. […] courtesy of planetware, redbubble, bubble.love, Micheal Wolf (magicalurbanism), An Informal Perception and quangas Share this:ShareLike this:LikeBe the first to like this […]

    75. These are very creative; seems like quite a bit of photoshop may have been utilized though.

    76. […] series on the “Architecture of Density” depicts the utter hugeness of apartment complexes in that […]

    77. […] images of Hong Kong’s density by Michael Wolf. They appear in their original context here, and he has a costly book on the subject as well… #gallery-2204-2 { margin: auto; } […]

    78. […] on http://www.magicalurbanism.com Évaluez ceci :Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintJ'aime ceci:J'aimeBe the first to like […]

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